Our wines in details

More details about wines we serve

SOMETHING MORE ABOUT OUR WINES

Thanks Wikipedia for accurate descriptions.

 

PROSECCO

Prosecco is an Italian sparkling white wine, generally a dry or extra dry wine. It is normally made from Glera (the grape formerly known, itself, as “Prosecco”) though other varieties, such as Bianchetta Trevigiana, are permitted to be included in the blend. Although the name is derived from that of the Italian village of Prosecco near Trieste, where the grape may have originated, DOC Prosecco is produced in the regions of Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia, traditionally mainly around Conegliano and Valdobbiadene, in the hills north of Treviso. Prosecco is the main ingredient of the Bellini cocktail and can be a less expensive substitute for Champagne. The flavor of Prosecco has been described as intensely aromatic and crisp, bringing to mind yellow apple, pear, white peach, and apricot.

FRASCATI

Frascati is an Italian white wine from the region of Frascati, (name of the town 25 km from ROME) in Lazio, Italy. Archeological discoveries from the ancient town of Tusculum , now Frascati, demonstrate the cultivation of grapes for wine since the 5th century B.C. it was one of the preferred wines of Ancient Rome , then of the Renaissance Popes , (Caravaggio would have drunk Frascati wine in his favorite Hostaria), Poets and artists visiting on the Grand Tour 1700s and 1800s, and in the 1960s of the Dolce Vita. If there is a wine that is synonymous with Rome, it is Frascati. Made from Malvasia di Candia, Malvasia del Lazio, Grechetto, Bombino bianco and Trebbiano grapes and has Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) and since 2013 DOCG status. The Frascati DOC/DOCG area is located in the heart of the Castelli Romani, Tuscolum and Albani Hills south of Rome, and north of Lake Albano. Many of the vineyards’ cellars have ancient Roman caves.

VERDICCHIO

Verdicchio [verˈdikkjo] is a white Italian wine grape variety grown primarily in the Marche region of central Italy. The name Verdicchio derives from verde (or “green”) and refers to the slight green/yellow hue that wines made from the grape can have. Verdicchio is the principal grape behind two Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) wines produced in the provinces of Macerata and Ancona, Verdicchio di Matelica and Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi. Verdicchio has had a long history in the Marche region of central Italy with documents noting its presence there since at least the 14th century. Despite its sensitivity to climate conditions and propensity to produce variable yields of variable quality wine, Verdicchio was a very popular planting in central Italy with an estimated 65,000 hectares planted in the mid-1980s. These figures made Verdicchio the 15th most planted variety of any grape in the world, ahead of well-known varieties like Chardonnay, Pinot noir, Sauvignon blanc and Sangiovese.

ORVIETO

Orvieto is an Italian wine region located in Umbria and Lazio, centered on the comune of Orvieto. It is primarily known for its white wines made from a blend of mostly Grechetto and Trebbiano, which is sold under the Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) Orvieto and Orvieto Classico. The region has been producing wine since the Middle Ages, when Orvieto wine was known as a sweet, golden-yellow wine. Today’s white Orvieto is dry. Viticulture was introduced to the Orvieto region by the early Etruscans, who carved out cellar-like caves from volcanic soil that could house wine production with long, cool fermentation and produced the type of sweet wine that was popular in the ancient world. From the Middle Ages to the mid-20th century, the Orvieto region was known for the sweet dessert wine made with the noble rot, Botrytis cinerea. Unlike most botrytized wine, such as Sauternes, where the grapes are introduced to the Botrytis cinerea fungus while they are on the vine, the grapes of Orvieto were exposed to the fungus after harvest, when they packed into crates and barrels and stored in humid grottoes carved out of the tufa stone. Made primarily from the Trebbiano sub-variety Procanico, which produces smaller berries than the Trebbiano used in Tuscan wines, these sweet wines were deep gold in color, described by the poet Gabriele d’Annunzio as “the sun of Italy in a bottle”.

FALANGHINA

It’s also called Falanghina Greco, is a variety of wine grape, Vitis vinifera, used for white wines. It is an ancient grape variety which may have provided a basis for the classical Falernian wine, and has considerable character. It is cultivated on the coast of Campania north of Naples, and frequently consumed in southern Italy along with seafood. The name for the wine appears to derive from the Latin “falangae”, or stakes for supporting the grapes in a vineyard.

PINOT GRIGIO

Pinot gris or Grauburgunder is a white wine grape variety of the species Vitis vinifera. Thought to be a mutant clone of the Pinot noir variety, it normally has a grayish-blue fruit, accounting for its name (gris meaning “gray” in French) but the grapes can have a brownish pink to black and even white appearance. The word pinot, which comes from the word meaning “pine cone” in French, could have been given to it because the grapes grow in small pine cone-shaped clusters. The wines produced from this grape also vary in color from a deep golden yellow to copper and even a light shade of pink, and it is one of the more popular grapes for orange wine. The clone of Pinot gris grown in Italy is known as Pinot grigio. Pinot gris is grown around the globe with the “spicy” full-bodied Alsatian and lighter-bodied, more acidic Italian styles being most widely recognized. The Alsatian style, often duplicated in New World wine regions such as Marlborough, Tasmania, Australia, Washington, and Oregon, tend to have moderate to low acidity, higher alcohol levels and an almost “oily” texture that contributes to the full-bodied nature of the wine. The flavors can range from ripe tropical fruit notes of melon and mango to some botrytis-influenced flavors. In Italy, Pinot grigio grapes are often harvested early to retain the refreshing acidity and minimize some of the overt-fruitiness of the variety, creating a more neutral flavor profile. This style is often imitated in other Old World wine regions, such as Germany where the grape is known as Ruländer.

BAROLO

Barolo is a red Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) wine produced in the northern Italian region of Piedmont. It is made from the Nebbiolo grape and is often described as one of Italy’s greatest wines. The zone of production extends into the communes of Barolo, Castiglione Falletto, Serralunga d’Alba and parts of the communes of Cherasco, Diano d’Alba, Grinzane Cavour, La Morra, Monforte d’Alba, Novello, Roddi, Verduno, all in the province of Cuneo, south-west of Alba. Although production codes have always stipulated that vineyards must be located on hillsides, the most recent revision of the production code released in 2010 goes further, categorically excluding valley floors, humid and flat areas, areas without sufficient sunlight, and areas with full-on northern exposures. Barolo is often described as having the aromas of tar and roses, and the wines are noted for their ability to age and usually take on a rust red tinge as they mature. Barolo needs to be aged for at least 38 months after the harvest before release, of which at least 18 months must be in wood. When subjected to aging of at least five years before release, the wine can be labeled a Riserva. In the past, Barolo wines tended to be rich in tannin. It could take more than 10 years for the wine to soften and become ready for drinking. Fermenting wine sat on the grape skins for at least three weeks extracting huge amounts of tannins and was then aged in large, wooden casks for years. In order to appeal to more modern international tastes, those that prefer fruitier, earlier drinking wine styles, several producers began to cut fermentation times to a maximum of ten days and age the wine in new French oak barriques (small barrels). “Traditionalists” have argued that the wines produced in this way are not recognizable as Barolo and taste more of new oak than of wine. The controversies between traditionalists and modernists have been called the “Barolo wars”., as depicted in Barolo Boys. The Story of a Revolution, a documentary film released in 2014.

VALPOLICELLA

Valpolicella is a viticultural zone of the province of Verona, Italy, east of Lake Garda. The hilly agricultural and marble-quarrying region of small holdings north of the Adige is famous for wine production. Valpolicella ranks just after Chianti in total Italian Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) wine production. The red wine known as Valpolicella is typically made from three grape varieties: Corvina Veronese, Rondinella, and Molinara. A variety of wine styles is produced in the area, including a recioto dessert wine and Amarone, a strong wine made from dried grapes. Most basic Valpolicellas are light, fragrant table wines produced in a nouveau style, similar to Beaujolais nouveau and released only a few weeks after harvest. Valpolicella Classico is made from grapes grown in the original Valpolicella production zone. Valpolicella Superiore is aged at least one year and has an alcohol content of at least 12 percent. Valpolicella Ripasso is a form of Valpolicella Superiore made with partially dried grape skins that have been left over from fermentation of Amarone or recioto. Winemaking in the region has existed since at least the time of the ancient Greeks. The name “Valpolicella” appeared in charters of the mid-12th century, combining two valleys previously thought of independently. Its etymology is unknown; it might derive from a Latin and Greek mixture for “Valley of Cellars.” Today Valpolicella’s economy is heavily based on wine production. The region, colloquially called the “pearl of Verona”, has also been a preferred location for rural vacation villas. Seven comuni compose Valpolicella: Pescantina, San Pietro in Cariano, Negrar, Marano di Valpolicella, Fumane, Sant’Ambrogio di Valpolicella and Sant’Anna d’Alfaedo. The Valpolicella production zone was enlarged to include regions of the surrounding plains when Valpolicella achieved DOC status in 1968.

LAMBRUSCO

Lambrusco (US /læm.ˈbrʊs.koʊ/; Italian pronunciation: [lam.ˈbru.sko]) is the name of both a red wine grape and an Italian wine made principally from the grape. The grapes and the wine originate from four zones in Emilia-Romagna and one in Lombardy, principally around the central provinces of Modena, Parma, Reggio nell’Emilia, and Mantua. The grape has a long winemaking history with archaeological evidence indicating that the Etruscans cultivated the vine. In Roman times, the Lambrusco was highly valued for its productivity and high yields with Cato the Elder stating that produce of two thirds of an acre could make enough wine to fill 300 amphoras. The most highly rated of its wines are the frothy, frizzante (slightly sparkling) red wines that are designed to be drunk young from one of the eight Lambrusco denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) regions: Colli di Parma Lambrusco, Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro, Lambrusco di Sorbara, Lambrusco Salamino di Santa Croce, Reggiano Lambrusco, Colli di Scandiano e Canossa Lambrusco, Modena Lambrusco, and Lambrusco Mantovano.

CHIANTI

Chianti wine [ˈkjanti] is any wine produced in the Chianti region, in central Tuscany, Italy. It was historically associated with a squat bottle enclosed in a straw basket, called a fiasco (“flask”; pl. fiaschi); however, the fiasco is only used by a few makers of the wine now; most Chianti is now bottled in more standard shaped wine bottles. Baron Bettino Ricasoli (later Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Italy) created the Chianti recipe of 70% Sangiovese, 15% Canaiolo and 15% Malvasia bianca in the middle of the nineteenth century. The first definition of a wine-area called Chianti was made in 1716.

BARDOLINO

Bardolino is an Italian red wine produced along the chain of morainic hills in the province of Verona to the east of Lake Garda. It takes its name from the town Bardolino on the shores of Lake Garda and was awarded Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) status in 1968. The blend of grapes used to produce the wine includes Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara. Up to 15% of the blend may include Rossignola, Barbera, Sangiovese and/or Garganega.

BARBERA D’ASTI

Barbera d’Asti is an Italian red wine made from the Barbera grape variety. It is produced in the hilly areas of the provinces of Asti (67 municipalities) and Alexandria (51 municipalities). Barbera d’Asti was accredited with DOC status in 1970, and DOCG status followed in 2008.[1] Under the DOCG rules, a minimum of 85% Barbera grapes must be used; the balance may be made up with either Freisa, Grignolino or Dolcetto grapes. The wine must be made before the date of 1 March immediately following the harvest, and must reach an alcohol content of 11.5%. The Barbera grape is believed to have originated in the hills of Monferrato in central Piedmont, Italy and is known from the thirteenth century. The first written proof of vinification is stored in the city hall of Nizza Monferrato and dates back to the seventeenth century. The wine enters officially in the roll of Piedmontese wines in 1798, the date of the first Ampelography made by Giuseppe Nuvolone-Pergamo, count of Scandaluzza from the Società Agraria di Torino (Agricultural Society of Turin). Barbera spread rapidly in the 19th and 20th centuries, and is today considered to be Piedmont’s principal red grape variety.

NERO D’AVOLA

Nero d’Avola (Italian pronunciation: [ˈnero ˈdavola]; “Black of Avola” in Italian) is “the most important red wine grape in Sicily”[1] and is one of Italy’s most important indigenous varieties. It is named after Avola in the far south of Sicily and its wines are compared to New World Shirazes, with sweet tannins and plum or peppery flavours. It also contributes to Marsala blends. “The Black Grape of Avola” appears to have been selected by growers near Avola (a small town in south east Sicily) several hundred years ago. Initially, it was confined to the southern tip of the island but more recently has spread throughout the island. Colour: cherry or ruby red. Perfume: typical, winy, fruity. Flavour: dry, slightly acid, rounded, warm and full-bodied. Serving Temperature: ambient.

MONTEPULCIANO D’ABRUZZO

Montepulciano d’Abruzzo is a red Italian wine made from the Montepulciano wine grape in the Abruzzo region of east-central Italy. It should not be confused with Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, a Tuscan wine made from Sangiovese and other grapes. Montepulciano d’Abruzzo was classified as Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) in 1968; a separate Denominazione di origine controllata e Garantita (DOCG) for wine produced around Teramo, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Colline Teramane (Teramo hills), was established in 1995 and promoted in 2003. In the late 20th and early 21st century, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo earned a reputation as one of the most widely exported DOC wines in Italy. It is typically dry with soft tannins and often consumed young. According to wine expert Oz Clarke, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo is often a deeply colored wine with pepper and spice notes. It can be described as “rustic” which Clarke says is less pronounced when the wine is paired with food. Master of Wine Mary Ewing-Mulligan describes the wines as aromatic, tannic and with low acidity. According to Italian wine expert Joe Bastianich, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo’s can be highly aromatic with earthy notes and black berries and have inky-purple color with a thick, almost syrupy mouthfeel.

PRIMITIVO

Primitivo is a heavy, blunt red wine; an effect of the warm growing conditions in Southern Italy’s Apulia region. The quality of Primitivo wine has been recognized in Italy for centuries. It was once mainly used for blending by more commercially successful wineries in Northern Italy. They relied on it to give their wines depth. Because of a general lack of commercialization in Apulia, Primitivo is still largely unknown outside of Italy. Small-scale producers have a hard time reaching the international market to compete on the same level as more famous Italian wine varieties. The Primitivo grape variety was discovered to be genetically similar to California’s Zinfandel. It has its roots in the oldest of wine traditions. While some claim that the Primitivo grape is originated in ancient Greece and been brought over by some of the first settlers of the Italian peninsula, recent research based upon DNA has shown it to be geneticall identical to a Croatian varietal. Primitivo di Manduria DOC is made from 100% Primitivo grapes (unlike other Primitivo wines, like Gioia del Colle Primitivo, which are blends). This wine is also characterized by an unusually high alcohol by volume percentage – around 14%. Wines made from Primitivo have notes of plum and spice, like Zinfandel, but because of different growing soils and climate, the fruit character is less jammy, the structure more akin to old world wines, with rustic notes of earth and spice, as well as tamed fruit flavors.